July 25th, 2017
ewan: Star (Default)
IMG_20170714_125716725

This week's featured article is Som Saa, E1 6BD, a well-regarded Thai restaurant that I've been meaning to go to for ages, just on the Spitalfields/Whitechapel border. However, luckily an RGL correspondent has done so, and plenty of positives resulted, albeit clustered along the sour/salty ends of the taste spectrum. Kake also tantalises readers with a suggestion of weird over-intimacy but we shall have to imagine.

Three new articles:

* Lituanica, a Lithuanian restaurant in the charming and delightful eastern oasis of Beckton, and part of what sounds like a Lithuanian department store. Expect potatoes and meat.
* Cafe Le Jardin in Whitechapel. It's a decent greasy spoon, though it is unclear whether there is indeed a garden, but the map doesn't suggest any.
* North End Tavern in Worcester Park. Welcoming yet fairly standard as these kinds of things (chain pubs in suburbia) go.
July 23rd, 2017
mrs_leroy_brown: (Default)
posted by [personal profile] mrs_leroy_brown at 11:19am on 23/07/2017 under
This is the second book I've read by Mindy Kaling and yet I still haven't seen The Mindy Project or The Office (US) - must rectify. These essays read like Mindy's confiding in you as a chum, and her anecdotes-as-memoir make it feel as though if you met in real life, you'd totally be besties. Whether it's explaining why Nosferatu is her style icon, or describing Dr Mindy Lahiri as "much less Elizabeth Bennet than she's a combination of Carrie Bradshaw and Eric Cartman" or noting "...the scary thing I have noticed is that some people really feel uncomfortable around women who don't hate themselves. So that's why you need to be a little bit brave", she avoids the usual self deprecation funny women are expected to center their comedy around.

Like Tina Fey's "Bossypants" and Amy Poehler's "Yes Please", I feel really inspired by her success and seriously, I'm totally going to watch The Mindy Project soon!
July 19th, 2017
mrs_leroy_brown: (Default)
posted by [personal profile] mrs_leroy_brown at 08:25pm on 19/07/2017 under
Herland is a turn of the century feminist utopian novel about three rich American dudes who seek out to discover (i.e. subdue and conquer) an isolated nation where there are no men. It's easy to make comparisons to Themyscira - girls are trained to enable them to protect themselves from a non-existent threat, educated to improve their society as well as themselves, and nurtured in a sisterhood whose religion is based on the honor of collective motherhood and ensuring the success of future generations.

Enter the menfolk: Jeff, a drippy romantic who yearns for a woman to protect and idealise, the kind who'd probably burst into tears if the lady of his affection let rip a stank pizza-and-beer fart; Terry, an oily lothario convinced against all evidence that he can vanquish the hotties for his own personal harem; Van, the level-headed sociologist narrator increasingly filled with doubt and guilt as he is educated in the ways of Herland (their term).

The penny drops for Jeff and Van - "We were now well used to seeing women not as females, but as people; people of all sorts, doing every kind of work", but gross Terry playacts his education and manages to ruin it for everyone. What a tool.

Being "of its time", Herland is chock full of gender essentialism and tiresome references to savages (naturally the ladies of Herland are all white). Everything else is very sign me up - big up the vegetarian diet and garments of many pockets! I enjoyed this short book, though it did feel like it ended somewhat abruptly where a "ten years later" style epilogue could have answered some unfinished questions.
July 18th, 2017
koganbot: (Default)
Tweetstorm on why I don't say "neoliberalism." Potentially way more interesting post on this subject if I bring in hairstyle (not a pejorative) and hallway-classroom and real life. Someday.





















Music:: The Rolling Stones "I Don't Know Why"
nou: The word "kake" in a white monospaced font on a black background (Default)

I seem to have got involved in organising Queer Code London. We have a breakfast meet in Central London on Tuesday 1 August Tuesday 8 August, 7:30am-9am, and I’d love to see as many people there as possible.

The breakfast is free and includes vegetarian options, and the building is step-free accessible. You’ll need to join the Meetup group to see the location, but it's in Central London within a couple of minutes’ walk of a zone 1 station. Spaces are limited, so sign up ASAP.

No allies, please – this event is for queer coders only — but please pass this on as widely as you like.

July 17th, 2017
katstevens: (dogswim)
Le Raj, Epsom, London KT17
Evening crew!

This week's featured article is for Le Raj in Epsom, a fancy joint that's earned a spot in the Good Curry Guide. The takeaway prices are a bit lower but you'll have to come and get it yourself, as they don't deliver.

New to RGL but certainly not new to me is the Soldier's Return, the third best pub in Ickenham. It's changed a little since I was drinking cheap lager there in the '90s - the tie's changed from Courage to Greene King, and they've apparently got rid of the (really quite manky) carpet. Also new is Karachi Cuisine in Norbury, a child-friendly Pakistani restaurant that does an interesting-sounding traditional breakfast on weekends. Try the chickpeas!

Finally, the Michelin-starred Dabbous in Fitzrovia has shut. Apparently the team will be opening a new (hopefully less noisy) restaurant next year.
July 15th, 2017
mrs_leroy_brown: (Default)
posted by [personal profile] mrs_leroy_brown at 05:40pm on 15/07/2017 under
Frances Wray is a posh but poor former flapper living with her mother in a crumbling Champion Hill manor. With her brothers all killed in the war and her father's passing, Frances and Mrs Wray open their home to "paying guests" (much more genteel than "lodgers") to help pay the bills. Enter boorish Len Barber and his beautiful wife, Lilian. Illicit love blossoms and just when the women make up their minds to run away, tragedy strikes.

This was not the book I was expecting (in a good way!) - the second half kept me gripped with its anxious, urgent, page-turning tension. If you're looking for a hefty period novel, meticulously researched but never too do-you-see?-y, this is a great book to get lost in.
July 13th, 2017
nou: The word "kake" in a white monospaced font on a black background (Default)
posted by [personal profile] nou in [community profile] rglondon at 03:47pm on 13/07/2017 under ,

I've added a thing to let us hide long blurbs on locale/category pages, since although it's good to have this info, it can end up pushing the lists of actual things in the locale quite a long way down the page.

To make this work, enclose your blurb like so:

<div class="blurb">
My very wordy essay on the history of Harefield.
</div>

You can see this in action on the Ickenham locale page, which has a great but long blurb written by [personal profile] katstevens.

Comments welcome!

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